Monday, January 10, 2011

Will e-Books Change Higher Education?

Many people--like DIY U author Anya Kamenetz and the 2010 Horizon report--believe that e-books will have a significant effect on higher education.

Certainly that's the hope in the province of Alberta. "E-books may cut fees for Alberta students" explains how the Advanced Education Minister in Alberta is actually trying to bring e-books to university students. Check out the details at http://www2.canada.com/calgaryherald/news/story.html?id=da46bdc1-c803-49f3-8152-c9f8c7e6ec07.

Copyright expert and University of Ottawa professor puts Alberta's project into a broader perspective in his article, "Canadian education faces technology tipping point." He suggests why excessive cost and duplication in print of resources that are already available to the university community online will drive demand for electronic course materials. Check out his article at http://www.thestar.com/business/article/908924--geist-canadian-education-faces-technology-tipping-point.

But maybe it's holiday gifts that will really drive demand. "Christmas Gifts May Help E-Books Take Root," published in the New York Times, explains how e-book readers being given for the holidays could drive e-book sales as early as this month. Check out the article at http://www.nytimes.com/2010/12/24/books/24publishing.html.

1 comment:

R. said...

if they do bring ebooks into higher education, I hope they format them better than ebooks I've seen in the past!

seems like a great idea though, better for the environment, easier to distribute, less of a strain on the uni, and indeed the students' budgets!